My daily thoughts and moods.
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23 of July, 2014

(Source: drunklostsouls, via love-fashion-shopping-music)


Posted 14 hours ago

85 notes
awwww-cute:

For my cakeday i give you angry baby possum
23 of July, 2014

awwww-cute:

For my cakeday i give you angry baby possum


Posted 14 hours ago

674 notes
heaven-ly-mind:

Sunrise over Maupiti by Raphael Bick on Flickr
23 of July, 2014

heaven-ly-mind:

Sunrise over Maupiti by Raphael Bick on Flickr

(via pikxchu)


Posted 14 hours ago

844 notes
tinykitchenvegan:

Everyday Nourish Bowl
23 of July, 2014

tinykitchenvegan:

Everyday Nourish Bowl


Posted 14 hours ago

62 notes
our-amazing-world:

Unique Amazing World beautiful amazing
23 of July, 2014

our-amazing-world:

Unique Amazing World beautiful amazing


Posted 15 hours ago

36 notes
23 of July, 2014

recoffthevine:

I DON’T KNOW WHAT I WAS EXPECTING BUT IT WASN’T THAT

(Source: vinesnow, via maycauseirritation)


Posted 15 hours ago

343,338 notes
optical-delusion:

BABY RACCOONS COVER THEIR EYES WHEN THEY GET SCARED AND OMG I JUST CANT ITS SO PRECIOUS
23 of July, 2014

optical-delusion:

BABY RACCOONS COVER THEIR EYES WHEN THEY GET SCARED AND OMG I JUST CANT ITS SO PRECIOUS

(via thecutestofthecute)


Posted 15 hours ago

148,898 notes
libutron:

The flight of the Wallace’s Flying Frog 
"Flying" frogs are distinguished from related, non-aerial, arboreal frogs, by their enlarged hands and feet, full webbing on the fingers and toes, and accessory skin flaps on the lateral margins of the arms and legs.
These “flying” frogs are not capable of powered flight, but do travel considerable horizontal distances during vertical descent. Technically they are considered as gliders and they also drop from vertical heights being as well parachuters.
Rhacophorus nigropalmatus (pictured) is one of those “flying” frogs, and move their front and hind limbs lateral to their bodies and spread their fingers and toes during aerial descent, adjusting limb position slightly during flight. They even are capable to execute turns of up to 180º while gliding.
The Wallace’s Flying Frog, occurs high in the canopy of primary rainforest in Borneo, but breeding takes place on the ground around water holes and wallows made in the forest by large animals and fallen trees. So, for this frog, maneuverability in gliding is a definite advantage in negotiation the spatially complicated but relatively open understory of the Bornean rainforest.
Once launched, these frogs always place their hands and feet in bent position lateral to the body. They adjust their limb position to improve aerial performance. Although skin flaps do not improve turning performance, enlarged hands and feet do. Changing limb position, however, can enhance turning performance almost as much as the enlargement of hands or feet alone.
Reference: [1]
Photo credit: ©kkchome | Locality: Sarawak, Borneo, Malaysia
23 of July, 2014

libutron:

The flight of the Wallace’s Flying Frog 

"Flying" frogs are distinguished from related, non-aerial, arboreal frogs, by their enlarged hands and feet, full webbing on the fingers and toes, and accessory skin flaps on the lateral margins of the arms and legs.

These “flying” frogs are not capable of powered flight, but do travel considerable horizontal distances during vertical descent. Technically they are considered as gliders and they also drop from vertical heights being as well parachuters.

Rhacophorus nigropalmatus (pictured) is one of those “flying” frogs, and move their front and hind limbs lateral to their bodies and spread their fingers and toes during aerial descent, adjusting limb position slightly during flight. They even are capable to execute turns of up to 180º while gliding.

The Wallace’s Flying Frog, occurs high in the canopy of primary rainforest in Borneo, but breeding takes place on the ground around water holes and wallows made in the forest by large animals and fallen trees. So, for this frog, maneuverability in gliding is a definite advantage in negotiation the spatially complicated but relatively open understory of the Bornean rainforest.

Once launched, these frogs always place their hands and feet in bent position lateral to the body. They adjust their limb position to improve aerial performance. Although skin flaps do not improve turning performance, enlarged hands and feet do. Changing limb position, however, can enhance turning performance almost as much as the enlargement of hands or feet alone.

Reference: [1]

Photo credit: ©kkchome | Locality: Sarawak, Borneo, Malaysia


Posted 15 hours ago

63 notes
neither:

LET ME HELP I CAN HELP I WILL HELP IM HELPING
23 of July, 2014

neither:

LET ME HELP I CAN HELP I WILL HELP IM HELPING

(Source: nikigoes, via thecutestofthecute)


Posted 15 hours ago

89,043 notes
thelovenotebook:

Good Vibes HERE
23 of July, 2014

thelovenotebook:

Good Vibes HERE


Posted 15 hours ago

1,679 notes